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Image from page 1158 of “An encyclopædia of agriculture : comprising the theory and practice of the valuation, transfer, laying out, improvement, and management of landed property, and of the cultivation and economy of the animal and vegetable productions

Image from page 1158 of “An encyclopædia of agriculture : comprising the theory and practice of the valuation, transfer, laying out, improvement, and management of landed property, and of the cultivation and economy of the animal and vegetable productions
Kitchen Improvements
Identifier: pdiaofaencyclo00loudrich
Title: An encyclopædia of agriculture : comprising the theory and practice of the valuation, transfer, laying out, improvement, and management of landed property, and of the cultivation and economy of the animal and vegetable productions of agriculture
Year: 1871 (1870s)
Authors: Loudon, J. C. (John Claudius), 1783-1843
Subjects: Agriculture — Dictionaries
Publisher: London : Longmans, Green
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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organised for mas-tication in their perfect state, and the second are organised for suction alone. Each of these divisions,according to the system of Macleay, contains five separate orders, the principal characters of which we shallendeavour to make intelligible in common language. 7652, The Mandibulata, or masticating insects, are furnished with jaws of a horny or membranaceoussubstance, infinitely diversified in their form and structure. They are divided into the following orders: — 1. Tric/nfptera. The wings are four, soft, and generally a tube of its own construction. There are many species in this transparent ; the upper pair slightly hairy* and the lower countrv, wel known, in their perfect state, to all lovers of ahg- fblded when at rest. The inserts of this order are compar- line. Phryganea rhdmbica (Jig. 967. c) may serve as an ax- atively few. The caddy, or cadis worm, is the larva of the ample of this order.spring fly (Phryganea), and lives in the water, concealed within

Text Appearing After Image:
2. HymemMcra. The wings are four, clear and transparent.The tarsus (or outer division of the foot) is composed of fivejoints, and the body is armed with a sting. The bee, the ant,and the wasp, are familiar examples. 5. Coltdptera. This well defined and most extensive ordercomprehends all insects known by the name of beetles. Theyhave two wings, concealed beneath a pair of hard wing-cases,which meet close together in a straight line down the back.There are many tribes of these insects, which, both in theirlarva and perfect state, are extensively injurious to man. 4. Ortfiiiplera. The irue wings are but two, very large whenexpanded, and folded lengthways when at rest. They are co-vered, either partially or wholly, by two wing-cases of a thin,tough, and rather opaque substance, somewhat resemblingparchment, and reticulated with small nerves. The leading roach ; the pest of tropical countries, and frequently trouble-some in our Kitchens and larders. 5. NeurtJptera. The wings, with very fe

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